Publications / Media Insight Central Asia Newsletter



MICA Nr. 22 / January 2002
Archive 2002 | 2001 | 2000
issue Nr. 21 | issue Nr. 23

Editorial

ISLAM IN CENTRAL ASIAN MEDIA: A PREOCCUPYING SILENCE
Discussed all over the world, the question of political Islam in Central Asia is almost absent from the media in the region. And under the pretext of ensuring national security, governments might be tempted to pressure even more dissent voices.
By Andre Loersch, CIMERA, Geneva
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Focus: Islam and Islamism in the Central Asian media

THE HIZB UT-TAHRIR THROUGH THE EYES OF KYRGYZ JOURNALISTS
The Hizb-ut-Tahrir movement is getting stronger in the Kyrgyz Republic. And while journalists report about them, the content and the tone of the coverage can either change or manifest the perception of the movement among the readership.
By Igor Grebenschikov, independent journalist, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
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A REVIEW OF ISLAM AND THE MEDIA IN UZBEKISTAN
“Hold the Koran in your one hand and a computer in the other,” was a popular slogan in the early 1990s with traditionally-minded intellectuals of Uzbekistan. Today the media cling to the Koran with both hands as they take up the issue of Islam.
By Marfua Tokhtakhojayeva, journalist, Uzbekistan
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THE ABSENCE OF DEBATE ON ISLAM IN THE TAJIK MEDIA
Despite the fact that the Party of Islamic Renaissance of Tajikistan has been integrated into the governmental structures, Islam or political Islam appear like taboo themes for the Tajik press, obviously reluctant to open debaters in that field.
By Gulchehra Mansurova, Dushanbe, Tajikistan
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Current events

UZBEK CENSORS ARE MAKING THE KORAN POLITICALLY CORRECT
Nothing seems to be holy for the censors in the Uzbek capital Tashkent. Official numbers on HIV are withheld from the public, the Pope disappears from newspaper agendas and now even the Koran is worked on with the censors’ red pen.
By Maksum Elbekov, independent journalist, Uzbekistan
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THE RIGHT TO WRITE: THE MEDIA VERSUS THE STATE IN KYRGYZSTAN
Kyrgyzstan’s independent press and the government have clashed. Two independent newspapers have been suspended, and a temporary new provision,‘The Order of Publishing Activities in the Kyrgyz Republic,’ restricts publishers’ rights.
By Vadim Blum, media expert, ICAM*, Kyrgyzstan
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TRIALS AND TRIUBULATIONS OF AN UZBEK NEWSPAPER IN KYRGYZSTAN
The first independent Uzbek language newspaper in Kyrgyzstan, Mezon, started in 1996, covering political news. Now it is closed because of debt, an absence of quality management, a shortage of professional staff and intra-office intrigues.
By Kamil Satkanbaev, journalist, Kyrgyzstan
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A UNION FOR UZBEKISTANI INDEPENDENT JOURNALISTS
Founded in April 2001, the Uzbekistan’s Union of Independent Journalists has staged a number of events in support of journalist’s rights. Though overburdened with censorship and control, media workers are not jumping to join the Union.
By Muhammad Amin, journalist, Uzbekistan
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REGIONAL CONFERENCE CALLS FOR NEW TRADE UNIONS
In the ciy of Almaty, Kazakhstan, journalists from five Central Asian countries discussed with international experts the problems of editorial independence and the reform of public television and radio broadcasting.
By Nuriddin Karshiboev, CIMERA, Tajikistan
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POST-CONFLICT AFGHANISTAN AND THE MEDIA IN TAJIKISTAN
Despite the direct effect that the reconstruction of post-Taliban Afghanistan will have on Tajikistan both at home and abroad, the country’s journalists seem to be ignoring the is-sue, mirroring the scope of reporting within Tajikistan itself.
By Turko Dikayev, independent journalist, Kulyab, Tajikistan
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Interview

UZBEK MEDIA: A VIEW FROM AN OUTSIDER LOOKING IN
Censorship in Uzbekistan impedes democratic progress and lowers the aspiration of journalists to develop their skills. A journalist from Uzbekistan who works in the West believes that the country’s media and society exist in parallel realities.
By Iskandar Khamroh, journalist, Uzbekistan
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Opinion

THE MEDIA AS POLITICIANS: OBJECTIVITY IN CENTRAL ASIA
In Central Asia, information on neighboring countries is scarce. For this and other reasons, the media is not yet in a position to provide versatile and objective information on the most important problems in the facing the region.
By Gulchehra Mansurova, Media-centre, Dushanbe, Tajikistan
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© Cimera 2002