Publications / Media Insight Central Asia Newsletter



MICA Nr. 23 / February 2002
Archive 2002 | 2001 | 2000
issue Nr. 22 | issue Nr. 24

Editorial

NO PROSPECTS TODAY FOR E-MEDIA IN CENTRAL ASIA
Journalists and media directors believe e-media development is mainly impeded by the authorities’ policy of denying access by any rivals to the state-run broadcasters and the silent but actual media censorship and self-censorship.
By Elmira Toktogulova, CIMERA, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
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Focus: Radio and Televisions in Central Asia

ACHILLES' HEEL OF THE KYRGYZ TV ANALYTICAL PROGRAMS
Kyrgyz TV channels ignore experts in political analysis. TV hosts use teleprompters for texts they have neither prepared nor written, remaining simply middlemen between the viewers and channel bosses who are imposing their flat judgements and one-sided viewpoints on their audience.
By Igor Grebenshchikov, independent reporter, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
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TAJIK GOVERNMENT WANTS TO SHARE THE BENEFIT OF PRIVATE TV AND RADIO
Because of its monopoly media position, the Television and Radio Broadcasting Committee, which operates under the Tajik government, does not always respect the licensing of non-governmental television and radio companies.
By Rufia Abduvahidova, Media-Centre, Dushanbe
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INDEPENDENCE IN EXCHANGE FOR STATE GRANT-MAINTAINED SYSTEM
With Tajikistan political freedom and market relations still in their infancy, some independent electronic mass media within the country are sacrificing their independence for the state’s support benefits.
By Turko Dikayev, independent reporter, Tajikistan
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TAJIKISTAN HAS SWITCHED OFF RUSSIAN TV BECAUSE OF ITS DEBTS
Russian ORT and RTR television broadcasts in Tajikistan has been restricted and even stopped, raising discussions within the Tajik media. Local experts believe that the main reason for these measures is not really the Russian’s debts, but rather the Tajik government’s attempt to stop broadcasts by anyone not under their control.
By Nargis Zakirova, journalist, Tajikistan
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NEW CONSTRAINTS FOR BROADCASTERS IN UZBEKISTAN
In October 2001, the Uzbek Government brought in a policy that indirectly impeds the development of the domestic telecom market. This policy, to raise license tariffs, particularly hurts the operations of private television companies.
By Charos Abdullayeva, Journalist, Tashkent
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UZBEKISTAN RIDES ON THE NEW FM RADIO WAVES
Commercial non-governmental FM radio stations are popular now in Uzbekistan. One of the factors for their success is the absence of overt editorial censorship. However, no radio editor will let any ‘political error’ be broadcast on a show.
By Rustam Sadykov, reporter, Uzbekistan
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TAJIK GOVERNMENT WANTS TO SHARE
THE BENEFIT OF PRIVATE TV AND RADIO
Because of its monopoly media position, the Television and
Radio Broadcasting Committee, which operates under the Tajik
government, does not always respect the licensing of non-gov-ernmental television and radio companies.
By Nisso Mansuri, Media-Centre, Dushanbe
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Current events

MEDIA ADULATION: THE TAJIK PRESIDENT ASKS TO TONE IT DOWN
The President of Tajikistan stated in an address that the media should “not to allocate excessive attention to the President’s personality.” Local journalist Gulchekhra Mansurova looks at how the republican media has responded to this request.
By Gulchekhra Mansurova, Media Center, Dushanbe
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KYRGYZSTAN PRINT SHOPS VERSUS FREEDOM OF THE PRESS
International organisations are involved in a project to launch an independent publishing house in Bishkek. Worried about state control in publishing, Kyrgyzstan’s media welcome this move as helping to protect freedom of speech.
By Bermet Bukasheva, reporter, Kyrgyzstan
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MASS MEDIA FREEDOM IN TURKMENISTAN: ONLY A MIRAGE
Turkmenistan today is a country where the idea of media freedom is still viewed largely along the same lines as it was under communism. What is worse, over the ten years that have passed since the collapse of the Soviet Union the country has seen a consistent policy aimed at subordinating all news media to the needs of a totalitarian state.
By Nazik Atayeva, reporter, Turkmenistan
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UZBEK OFFICIALS KINDLY SUGGEST AN AGENDA FOR THE UZBEK MEDIA
From this March onwards, Uzbekistan’s mass media will not only have to defer to the opinion of the State Committee for the Press censors, but also pay heed to the chiefs at the presidential press service, who expect media to plan and announce their content one year in advance.
By Bobomurod Abdullayev, reporter, Tashkent, Uzbekistan
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AFGHAN AND UZBEKISTANI JOURNALISTS MEET IN TERMEZ
“Unless freedom of expression and democracy are based on a strong economy they can spark tension and conflicts in society,” said reporters from northern Afghanistan who were invited to attend a seminar in Termez, Uzbekistan, where they met with Uzbek colleagues to discuss media liberalisation.
By Iskandar Khamroh, journalist, Uzbekistan
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© Cimera 2002