Publications / Media Insight Central Asia Newsletter



MICA Nr. 25 / June 2002
Archive 2002 | 2001 | 2000
issue Nr. 24

Editorial

INTERNET DEVELOPMENT IN CENTRAL ASIAN COUNTRIES
The explosion of information available on the Web has not yet reached Central Asia. When it does, the authorities intend to seek control of this media by monopolizing access to the Internet.
By Nuriddin Karshiboyev, CIMERA, Dushanbe
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Focus: Internet in Central Asian countries:

ONLINE EDITION IN UZBEKISTAN: ZONE OF INACTION
Uzbekistan has imposed a state monopoly of Web access in a bid to gain control of the information flow. Costly Internet services make access to the World Wide Web prohibitive while Internet journalism remains in its infancy.
By Rustan Sadykov, reporter, Uzbekistan
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THE TADJIKISTAN INTERNET: PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS
Currently four Tajikistan-based companies provide Internet access in Tajikistan. For Tajikistan, where the media is reviving after a period of crisis, the Internet has become the most reliable bridge to the global information world and the most rapid and credible source of information about the country itself.
By Gulnora Amirshoeva, journalist, Tadjikistan
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WHO CONTROLS THE INTERNET IN KYRGYZSTAN?
Kyrgyztelecom’s involvement in the Internet-service market is striking fear amongst the private sector and among independent experts. They fear that Internet access will be monopolized by the state.
By Viktor Parfyanov, media expert, Institute for Civil Appraisals and Media, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
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TAMING THE INTERNET: THE KAZAKH EXPERIENCE
On May 3, 2001 amendments to the Law on Media became effective after long debates. One of the amendments is a unique case of legitimate taming of the Internet through classifying web sites as the media.
By Olga Artamonova, journalist, Alma-Aty
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Current events

INTERNECINE WARS IN THE NEWS MEDIA OF KYRGYZSTAN
With an aggravated sociopolitical situation in Kyrgyzstan, antagonism between state-owned and private news media tends to grow into warfare.
By Veronika Komarova, CIMERA, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
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UZBEKISTAN MASS MEDIA FREE OF CENSORSHIP: FIRST IMPRESSIONS
Last May saw an end to pre-publication censorship of newspapers and magazines, radio and television in Uzbekistan – a practice that had seemed interminable. This long-awaited move opened up golden opportunities to the national media, on the one hand, and gave rise to new problems, on the other.
By Maksum Elbekov, reporter, Uzbekistan
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SUPERVISION OF UZBEKISTAN'S PROVINCIAL NEWS MEDIA TIGHTENS
Not so long ago the provincial press of Uzbekistan felt it was relatively free compared with national media. But the situation has changed dramatically, and there are significant facts that have caught the attention of the public in Samarkand province.
By Kakul Mirzo, reporter, Uzbekistan
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© Cimera 2002